HISTORY OF ARABICA COFFEE

Arabica coffee was first discovered in Ethiopia around 500 AD, and then distributed to tropical countries in the colonial era.

 

HISTORY OF  COFFEE IN INDONESIA

The beginning of coffee plantation in Indonesia began in  1696 by Nicholas Witsen, the Mayor of Amsterdam, who  gave order to Adrian Van Ommen, the commander of the Dutch forces in Malabar India, to carry Arabica coffee  seeds into Indonesia. The first trial was conducted in  Pondok Kopi area, Jakarta. Coffee grew exquisitely well,  therefore the Dutch established the first coffee  plantation in the Priangan area of West Java.

Coffee was cultivated in almost all regions of Java Island  in 1750, then the Dutch began developing Arabica coffee  plantations in Sumatra, Bali, Sulawesi and the Timor  Islands.

 

FIRST  COFFEE EXPORT

In 1711, the first export transaction of coffee was done with Dutch trading company, known as the  VOC (Verininging Oogst Indies Company). The VOC  monopolized the coffee trade from 1725 to 1780. Java  Island was the place beside Middle East and Ethiopia  where coffee was widely cultivated.

It was recorded that in 1725, Indonesia was the  largest coffee exporter in the world. At that time,  most of Indonesian coffee was from the Java Island.

 

PESTS RUINED INDONESIAN COFFEE

The fall of Javanese coffee began when coffee leaf rust  struck in 1878. Every plantation in the entire Indonesia  was affected by Hemileia Vasatrix, a type of coffee  pest. West Java was the worst affected area. This  outbreak killed all Arabica plants that grew in the  low altitude. The remaining Arabica coffee was the one that grew  on land with the altitude of 1,000 meters above sea level